One Size Does Not Fit All when It Comes to Heart Disease and Stroke

Caucasian and blacks are five times more at risk for heart disease and stroke due to obesity than are Chinese people. Type 2 diabetes is twice as prevalent in South Asians and Blacks than found among Caucasians and Chinese people.

One size fits all is not the strategy needed to treat stroke and heart disease, as stipulated by the authors of the study published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal. By treating these diseases the same way for everyone, doctors are ignoring the unique characteristics and needs of different ethic groups.

What the researchers from the Ontario's Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES), found is that the risk factors for heart disease and stroke will be different depending upon ethnicity. This finding is very important so that each ethnic group understands what are their risk factors and how to possibly prevent these deadly conditions.

Here are some of the findings for the Ontario population:

Caucasian and blacks are five times more at risk for heart disease and stroke due to obesity than are Chinese people.

Type 2 diabetes is twice as prevalent in South Asians and Blacks than found among Caucasians and Chinese people.

Heart and stroke (cardiovascular disease) is 2 times as high for South Asians than it is for Chinese people.

It has long been known that Blacks suffer higher rates of high blood pressure than do Caucasians and this study found that Blacks were at a 44 percent at higher risk, while South Asians had 24 percent higher risk for hypertension than their Ontario Caucasian counterparts.

It is also noted that Caucasians are more likely to smoke than both South Asians (8.6%) and Chinese people (8.7%) . It is also interesting that even though the amount of smokers among these two ethnic groups are significantly lower than in India (15.6 percent) and China at 28.9 percent.

This research studied more than 165, 000 Ontario subjects and found that overall Chinese people had the lowest risk for “cardiovascular risk factor profile”. Less than five percent of the Chinese population surveyed reported the usual risk factors: smoking, obesity, high blood pressure, and diabetes.

The second lowest ethnic group was the South Asians.

Other findings showed that Black women were at a higher risk than Black men for high blood pressure, diabetes, and heart disease.

Men smoked more than women, but the differences in cardiovascular disease was smaller in the Caucasian and Black populations than in the South Asian and Chinese populations.

Men exercised more than women except for South Asian men.

This study funded by the Ontario Heart and Stroke Foundation is the most comprehensive study to date.

Montrealers can seek more information through the

Montreal Heart and Stroke Foundation

http://www.heartandstroke.com/site/c.ikIQLcMWJtE/b.3382505/k.29EB/Contact_Us/apps/ka/ct/contactus.asp?c=ikIQLcMWJtE&b=3382505&en=7eLIJNPkFaLLLNNqEjJGIINuFgJOIVMqHhIQKVPrFfLVL7J

http://www.ctv.ca/servlet/ArticleNews/story/CTVNews/20100419/ethnic_health_100419/20100419?hub=Health

 

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